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EXERCISE

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EXERCISE 1:      MULTIPLE CHOICE QUIZ

  • Since you have done some reading about The Carpet Fitter  from lesson 1, lets test on your reading.
  • Instruction: Click the picture below to direct to the exercise. Once you clicked, you  are given 15 minutes to read the passage and answer the questions. good luck

magic_carpet

 

EXERCISE 2: TRUE & FALSE

  • True & false questions will test your memory on some main points highlighted in the passage.
  • Instruction: Click the picture below to direct to the exercise. Once you clicked, you  are given 15 minutes to read the passage and answer the questions.
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EXERCISE 3: MATCHING 

  • The matching exercise will test your understanding on the passage.
  • Instruction: Click the picture below to direct to the exercise. Once you clicked, read the instruction given carefully before answering the questions.

door

 

EXERCISE 4: CLOSE PASSAGE 

  • The close passage will test your understanding on the vocabulary.
  • Hints are given to help you to find the correct answer.

Instruction: Click the picture below to direct to the exercise. Once you clicked, read the instruction given carefully before answering the questions.

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EXERCISE 5: CROSSWORD PUZZLE QUIZ 

  • The crossword puzzle will test your understanding on the passage.
  • Instruction: Click the picture below to direct to the exercise. Once you clicked, read the instruction given carefully before answering the questions.

crossword

 

EXERCISE 6: JUMBLED SENTENCES

  • The jumble up exercise focus on rearranging the words to form the correct sentence.
  • Instruction: Click the picture below to direct to the exercise. Once you clicked, read the instruction given carefully before answering the questions.

1 (1) 1 (2) 1 (3)1 (4)1 (5)

Teacher’s Guide

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The objectives of the lessons:obje

  1. To explain the Simple Past Tense grammar rules to students;
  2. To  find the Simple Past Tense explanations confusing; and
  3. To make students understand some expressions using Simple Past Tense, etc.

Materials and resources:

images (1)Teacher can use different strategies for teaching grammar to students. It depends on learning styles that students prefer. For example, teacher can use computer to teach grammars for students who like this style. While, for students who prefer the spoken explanations, teacher might explain them the grammars with a number of examples.

The teacher role is to facilitate students to do their own learning. As well as, to introduce teaching explanations as a way of clearing up misunderstandings. Moreover, to provide exercises, which focus on the correct construction of the grammar point. This could be an exercise such as a fill the gap, cloze or tense conjugation activity. So, teacher would divide the portion into three parts.

The first part begins with Simple Past Tense where the teacher can teach the lesson steps and teach student the Simple Past Tense, it is valuable to mention that there are many related links in this lesson, it is important to inform students to navigate them for more interaction and deep understanding.

In the second part, lesson 2 Self-learning (Past tense) the bloge help the students to teach the themselves  as a self-learning.

In the final part, The Carpet Fitter after read the passage completely , students should be asked to explain the grammar- Simple Past Tense with define the Past Verbs and full examples prome the passage according to their understanding, which gives the teacher a clear picture of students understanding.

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Useful Links

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1- This is a very popular link, you can learn by using the link below more about past tense:

Past Tense.

2- Wikipedia, is a free encyclopedia.  Use the link below and find more about past tense:

Wikipedia-logo-id

3- LEARN AMERICAN ENGLISH ONLINE is a very interesting blog, here is the link of the past tense part where you can fine more about (simple form-regular verbs.

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4- a Storytelling –  is a very interesting exercise of Simple Past Tense- try it now.

Storytelling - Simple Past Tense5- In the (Reading ESL) page there are many stories and simple tense usage.

read

 

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2- Self-learning (Past tense)

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Past simple tense, one of the elementary past tenses in the English language. you are going to see how the form of a past simple tense and when you can use a past simple tense.

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The following movie is a grammar lesson,  you can learn about past simple time markers. Time markers like yesterday, just now, last week, and ago can help you to know if you should use the past simple tense or present perfect. .

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Past Simple Verbs _ very interesting practising song

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1- Simple Past Tense

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PAST SIMPLE

The Simple Past Tense, often just called the Past Tense, is easy to use in English.desismileys_6526

If you already know how to use the Present Tense, then the Past Tense will be easy.

In general, the Past Tense is used to talk about something that started and finished at a definite time in the past.

How to form the Past Tense in Englishcogsanim

The main rule is that for every verb in English, there is only one form of it in the past tense.
(The exception is the Past tense of To Be, which has two forms: was and were)

This is totally different from other languages such as Spanish, French, Italian etc. where you change the verb ending for every subject.

For example: The past tense of the verb want is wanted.
Wanted is used as the past tense for all subjects/pronouns.

  • I wanteddesismileys_6526
  • You wanted
  • He wanted
  • She wanted
  • It wanted
  • We wanted
  • They wanted

So you just have to learn one word to be able to use it in the past tense. In this case we just needed to learn the one word wanted which can be used for all subjects (or people).

Past Tense Regular Verbsm_verbs

To change a regular verb into its past tense form, we normally add –ED to the end of the verb.

  • play – played
  • cook – cooked
  • rain – rained
  • wait – waited

There are some exceptions with a slight change in spelling which you can see here:
Spelling of words ending in ED.

Examples of sentences using regular verbs in the past tensedownload (1)

  • Last night I played my guitar loudly and the neighbors complained.
  • She kissed me on the cheek.
  • It rained yesterday.
  • Angela watched TV all night.
  • John wanted to go to the museum.

Note: There are three different ways of pronouncing the –ed at the end of a verb in the past tense.
We recommend reading our guide about the pronunciation of –ED at the end of words.

Negative sentences in the Past Tense

We use didn’t (did not) to make a negative sentence in the past tense.
This is for regular AND irregular verbs in English.
(Exception is To Be and Modal Verbs such as Can)

Compare the following:

Present: They don’t live in Canada.
Past: They didn’t live in Canada.

The main verb (live in the example above) is in its base form (of the infinitive). The auxiliary DIDN’Tshows that the sentence is negative AND in the past tense.

NOTICE: The only difference between a negative sentence in the present tense and a negative sentence in the past tense is the change in the auxiliary verb.

Both don’t and doesn’t in the present tense become didn’t in the past tense.

Compare the negative sentences in the examples below:

Present: You don’t need a mechanic.
Past: You didn’t need a mechanic.

Present: You don’t walk to work.
Past: You didn’t walk to work.

Present: He doesn’t speak Japanese.
Past: He didn’t speak Japanese.

Examples of negative sentences in the Past Tense34_negative

  • I didn’t want to go to the dentist.
  • She didn’t have time.
  • You didn’t close the door.
  • He didn’t come to my party.
  • They didn’t study so they didn’t pass the test.
  • We didn’t sleep well last night.

 

Questions in the Past Tensebalance_questions_md_wm

We use did to make a question in the past tense.
This is for regular AND irregular verbs in English.
(Exception is To Be and Modal Verbs such as Can)

Compare the following:

Present: Do they live in France?
Past: Did they live in France?

The main verb (live in the example above) is in its base form (of the infinitive). The auxiliary DID shows that the question is in the past tense.

NOTICE: The only difference between a question in the present tense and a question in the past tense is the change in the auxiliary verb.
Both Do and Does in present tense questions become Didn’t in past tense questions.

Compare the questions in the examples below:

Present: Do you need a doctor?
Past: Did you need a doctor?

Present: Do you ride your bike to work?
Past: Did you ride your bike to work?

Present: Does he live in Italy?
Past: Did he live in Italy?

We can also use a question word (Who, What, Why etc.) before DID to ask for more information.

  • Did you study? – Yes, I did.
  • When did you study? – I studied last night.
  • Where did you study? – I studied at the library.

Read more about short answers in the past tense.

Examples of Questions in the Past Tense

  • Did you go to work yesterday?
  • Did they arrive on time?
  • Did she like the surprise?
  • Where did she go?
  • What did you do yesterday?
  • What did you say? – I didn’t say anything.
  • Why did we have to come?

Irregular Verbs in the Past Tense

Irregular verbs are ONLY irregular in affirmative/positive sentences.
(An exception to this is with the verb TO BE in the Past Tense).

For example: The past tense of GO is WENT.
It does not end in –ED so it is considered irregular.

The word went is used for all subjects – I, you, we, they, he, she, it.

  • I went to the beach
  • He went to the park.
  • She went to the zoo.
  • They went to the library.

BUT, as we mentioned before, it is only in its irregular form (went) in sentences that are affirmative/positive.

Compare the following using GO in the past tense.

  • They went to the beach
  • They didn’t go to the beach — Didn’t shows that we are talking in the past tense.
  • Did they go to the beach? — Did shows that we are talking in the past tense.

Another example with an irregular verb.
The past of EAT is ATE.

  • You ate my cake.
  • You didn’t eat my cake.
  • Did you eat my cake?

Next activityjcxEo6bRi

Try our game about Past Tense Irregular Verbs.

See our long list of irregular verbs in English.

Read about how to use To Be in the Past tense and about using short answers for questions in the Past Tense.

 

We are very happy to receive any comments to develop the page

If  you found this guide about the Past Tense in English useful, then share it with others:

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3- The Carpet Fitter

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letter-clipart-Cyrillic_E_Clip_Artddie was a carpet fitter, and he hated it. For ten years he had spent his days sitting, squatting, kneeling or crawling on floors, in houses, offices, shops, factories and restaurants. Ten years of his life, cutting and fitting carpets for other people to walk on, without even seeing them. When his work was done, no-one ever appreciated it. No- one ever said “Oh, that’s a beautiful job, the carpet fits so neatly.” They just walked all over it. Eddie was sick of it.

He was especially sick of it on this hot, humid day in August, as he worked to put the finishing touches to today’s job. He was just cutting and fixing the last edge on a huge red carpet which he had fitted in the living room of Mrs. Vanbrugh’s house. Rich Mrs. Vanbrugh, who changed her carpets every year, and always bought the best. Rich Mrs. Vanbrugh, who had never even given him a cup of tea all day, and who made him go outside when he wanted to smoke. Ah well, it was four o’clock and he had nearly finished. At least he would be able to get home early today. He began to day-dream about the weekend, about the Saturday football game he always played for the local team, where he was known as “Ed the Head” for his skill in heading goals from corner kicks.

Eddie sat back and sighed. The job was done, and it was time for a last cigarette. He began tapping the pockets of his overalls, looking for the new packet of Marlboro he had bought that morning. They were not there.

It was as he swung around to look in his toolbox for the cigarettes that Eddie saw the lump. Right in the middle of the brand new bright red carpet, there was a lump. A very visible lump. A lump the size of the size of a packet of cigarettes.

“Blast!” said Eddie angrily. “I’ve done it again! I’ve left the cigarettes under the blasted carpet!”

isfpanel02He had done this once before, and taking up and refitting the carpet had taken him two hours. Eddie was determined that he was not going to spend another two hours in this house. He decided to get rid of the lump another way. It would mean wasting a good packet of cigarettes, nearly full, but anything was better than taking up the whole carpet and fitting it again. He turned to his toolbox for a large hammer.

Holding the hammer, Eddie approached the lump in the carpet. He didn’t want to damage the carpet itself, so he took a block of wood and placed it on top of the lump. Then he began to beat the block of wood as hard as he could. He kept beating, hoping Mrs. Vanbrugh wouldn’t hear the noise and come to see what he was doing. It would be difficult to explain why he was hammering the middle of her beautiful new carpet.

After three or four minutes, the lump was beginning to flatten out. Eddie imagined the cigarette box breaking up, and the crushed cigarettes spreading out under the carpet. Soon, he judged that the lump was almost invisible. Clearing up his tools, he began to move the furniture back into the living room, and he was careful to place one of the coffee tables over the place where the lump had been, just to make sure that no-one would see the spot where his cigarettes had been lost. Finally, the job was finished, and he called Mrs. Vanbrugh from the dining room to inspect his work.

“Yes, dear, very nice,” said the lady, peering around the room briefly. “You’ll be sending me a bill, then?”

“Yes madam, as soon as I report to the office tomorrow that the job is done.” Eddie picked up his tools, and began to walk out to the van. Mrs. Vanbrugh accompanied him. She seemed a little worried about something.

“Young man,” she began, as he climbed into the cab of his van, laying his toolbox on the passenger seat beside him, “while you were working today, you didn’t by any chance see any sign of Armand, did you? Armand is my parakeet. A beautiful bird, just beautiful, such colors in his feathers… I let him out of his cage, you see, this morning, and he’s disappeared. He likes to walk around the house, and he’s so good, he usually just comes back to his cage after an hour or so and gets right in. Only today he didn’t come back. He’s never done such a thing before, it’s most peculiar…”

“No, madam, I haven’t seen him anywhere,” said Eddie, as he reached to start the van.

And saw his packet of Marlboro cigarettes on the dashboard, where he had left it at lunchtime….

And remembered the lump in the carpet….

And realised what the lump was….

And remembered the hammering….

And began to feel rather sick….

 

 

Adapted from  

   http://web2.uvcs.uvic.ca/courses/elc/studyzone/410/reading/fitter.htm

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